The PhotoBook Journal

March 26, 2017

Klaus Pichler and Clemens Marschall – Golden Days Before They End

00-Pichler Cover.jpg

Photographer:  Klaus Pichler (Austrian, lives and works in Vienna)

Publisher:  Edition Patrick Frey, Zurich, Switzerland, © 2016

Essay and quotes:  Compiled and edited by Clemens Marschall

Text:  German or English (translated by Charlotte Maconochie and Clemens Marschall

Hardcover book, sewn binding; 250 unnumbered pages; 120 color photographs; German and English editions; including 100/96 pages of text, with quotes by owners and patrons, list of venues, and glossary; printed and bound in Austria; 29×23 cm

Photobook Designer:  Roland Hörmann

 

Notes:

This work contains a pictorial portion of 120 color photographs by Klaus Pichler and four interspersed text portions totaling 96 pages (English edition) and 100 pages (German edition), bound in four segments within the picture sections. These text portions consist of a huge number of quotes (collected and edited by Clemens Marschall) that give fascinating insights into the lives of both the owners and the patrons of small Viennese bars that are the subject of the photographs, as well as a list of these 70 or so venues that the authors visited and depicted, a glossary of some of the choice phrases and terms from the quotes (how about “Baucherl” and “Strizzi” for starters!), and the customary publishing information. The German text portion is slightly larger because it includes an expanded glossary of choice local dialect and colloquial expressions. Wherever the images contain relevant language material, a translation is thoughtfully provided below the picture. An impressive collection of visual and textual data!

So here we have Vienna (not Hamburg as in the case of Anders Petersen’s Café Lehmitz), a documentation of not just one but many similar small bars, often on the brink of financial disaster and destined for a subsequent demise, and patrons that derive a “good time” both from the liquid refreshments consumed as well as from a shared coexistence marked by comfort and camaraderie. As for the photographic documentation, Pichler ably demonstrates the efficacy of color for this stark documentary work, where formerly monochrome images were the standard. Color is just fine for the impact that is required for this in-your-face dramatic presentation of people tableaus and “barscapes.” The horizontal format predominates. In 2013, Doug Stockdale reviewed a previous work by Klaus Pichler that also demonstrated his eye for the unusual.

A world that is not always so observable is shown here. These small bars are mostly very funky and idiosyncratic. Their customers are depicted in various stages of inebriation and sometimes acting out or clowning for the camera – they are being themselves and sharing their special world with us. In control of themselves or not, they do not seem to feel shame to show us their definition of togetherness and belonging. As outsiders looking in on them, we marvel at their narrowly defined bit of paradise. One of the intriguing tasks for the viewer is to imagine who said what, since the quotes articulated by owners and patrons, though attributed, are not assigned to any specific individuals depicted in the picture section, but they do allow us to study a variety of insider perspectives to complement the visual documentation.

I consider this comprehensive volume a most enjoyable new classic!

Gerhard Clausing

01-Pichler.jpg

02-Pichler.jpg

03-Pichler.jpg

04-Pichler.jpg

05-Pichler.jpg

06-Pichler.jpg

07-Pichler.jpg

08-Pichler.jpg

March 18, 2017

Lorena Endara – Ė Arenas: Nariz

Filed under: Book Publications, Book Reviews, Photo Book Discussions, Photo Books — Tags: , — Gerhard Clausing @ 2:04 am

00-L.Endara.JPG.JPG

Photographer:  Lorena Endara (Los Angeles, CA)

Music:  Composed, arranged, and produced by Eduardo Arenas

Publisher:   Producciones Con Sal, Los Angeles, © 2016

Stiff cover, saddle stitch binding; 32 unnumbered pages; 13 color photographs, accompanied by the corresponding song titles from the vinyl album that it accompanies; printed in Los Angeles, CA; 8.5×8.5 inches

Photobook Designer:  Lorena Endara

 

Notes:

A labor of love and creativity – this package of music and photography speaks of all that and more.

Eduardo Arenas, a talented composer and musician, plays a variety of instruments and sings, along with some support musicians, in a set of twelve songs that comprise this exciting innovative solo album, Ė Arenas – Nariz. The “in your face” themes reflect our time – ever searching and sometimes finding. The resulting “world fusion” music (using this term in a supportive, constructive way here) is most expressive, showing Anglo, Latin, and Brazilian influences, in the rhythms and in the lyrics as well. Outstanding sounds, a variety of unexpected pleasures, speak for the creativity of the artist. You can preview the music on this CD Baby page.

And, getting to our main focus here, his lady, Lorena Endara, worked hard during those six years as well, supporting the project, and was also inspired to create images that reflect the tenor of the musical pieces. And again, we report a distinct measure of success; instead of merely illustrating the content of the music and lyrics, the images are in themselves an interpretation of the emotional substance and context of what the music represents and engenders. In her images, she achieves a level of abstraction that allows the viewer/listener to dream and wonder. You will need to obtain the vinyl version (yay! resurgence of vinyl!) to appreciate the images, printed in a separate booklet that comes with the album; some of the double pages are reproduced below.

We are looking forward to further work from this talented team!

Gerhard Clausing

01-L.Endara.JPG

02-L.Endara.jpg

03-L.Endara.JPG

04-L.Endara.JPG.JPG

05-L.Endara.JPG.JPG

March 15, 2017

Printing donations for Book design workshop

Filed under: Book Publications, Photo Book NEWS, Photo Book Discussions — Tags: , — Doug Stockdale @ 10:33 pm

Photo book parts - Dual Graphics - Peanut Press

Courtesy of Dual Graphics & Peanut Press, 2017 photo by Douglas Stockdale

I have been asking around to various publishers and book printing companies for some commercial signatures to help illustrate some aspects of my pending Introduction to Photo Book Design workshop. A signature is somewhat foreign to photographers who have not been involved in commercial printing of a book; a printed sheet printed on a litho press which has multiple pages (images) that once folded and trimmed will become the interior pages of a photobook.

I am happy to announce that I have some really great signature donations from my friends at Dual Graphics (Brea, CA) and Peanut Press (David Carol and Ashly Stohl). These samples will really help illustrate my discussion regarding aspects of a commercially printed photobook; one-sided, two-sided signatures and what the resulting photobook (David Carol’s No Plan B, 2016 published by Peanut Press). Again, my sincere thanks to both Dual Graphics and Peanut Press!

Also some good news: there is still room for a couple more photographers and book makers to join me in what should be an interesting workshop: This will be held in conjunction with the Los Angeles Center for Photography (LACP), Introduction to Photo Book Design: two consecutive Saturdays (April 1st and 8th, 2017) at the LACP facilities in Los Angeles.

Cheers

 

March 13, 2017

Bronx Photo League – Jerome Ave

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_cover

Copyright 2016 Members of the Bronx Photo League

Photographers: Bronx Photo League (Bronx, NYC)

Publisher: Bronx Documentary Center Editions, Bronx, NY

Essays: Mike Kamber, Ed Murphy

Text: English & Spanish

Hardcover book, linen covers with tipped in image, sewn binding, 93 Black & white photographs, duo-tone printing with spot varnish, captions, member biographs, printed by Fort Orange Press, NY

Photobook designer: Bonnie Briant & Katie Khouri

Notes: Jerome Ave is an investigation of a community within the Bronx of New York by a group of young, budding photojournalist that have come together as the Bronx Photo League. Their purpose and intent is not all-together different from than that of the Photo League of the 1940’s; a collective of inspired photographers who want to learn their craft in conjunction with documenting the local environmental, economic and social changes that surround them.

This hard cover book is a result of one of their recent projects; attempting to document the pending changes to an area of the South Bronx. This is currently one of the city’s poorest regions, much of it situated under the elevated “4” train, a “gritty two-mile stretch of low-slung buildings where thousands of immigrants work in small stores, factories and car repair shops.”

Their focus is principally on the individuals who work and live in this small region to narrative this study, usually including some environmental context that provides clues to the working conditions, thus creating an indirect portrait of the South Bronx. It is evident to the reader that these photographers know their subjects very well by the close and tightly composed portraits, not a quick snap-shot from an impersonal distance.

The manual process of the photographic methods is also a nice metaphor for this project and their subjects who are predominantly providing manual labor to make a living. It appears that another consistent requirement for the photographers is to pay close attention to the framing of their images keeping in mind that there will be no cropping of the negative (a luxury that will come later in their photojournalistic lives).

One nice design aspect of this book that unifies this collective body of work together by the various photographers is the image/page layout; each photograph is framed by the negative’s exterior (yes, old school Tri-X film and manual processing). This design provides a consistency in the reading of the images that I think works very well to illustrate their project.

Cheers

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_1

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_2

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_3

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_4

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_5

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_6

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_7

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_8

Bronx_Photo_League-Jerome_Ave_9

March 3, 2017

Carol Golemboski – Psychometry

Untitled-1

Copyright 2016 Carol Golemboski

Photographer: Carol Golemboski (b. Shreveport, Louisiana – resides outside Denver, CO)

Publisher: Flash Powder Projects

Essay: Shirley Jackson

Text: English

Hardcover book, embossed cover, duo-tone printing, Smyth sewn binding, captions, printed by EBS, Verona, Italy

Photobook designer: Jordan Swartz

Notes: Golemboski’s monograph of intricate manipulated photographs investigate nostalgia, loss and impermanence. The manipulated prints use an old school Black & White wet-print technique; a mask that is hand-scribe by the photographer to modify her photographic “reality” during the print making process. Her marks are a mash-up of careful delineated lines, scratches, letters, and drawings, which are similar to a digital layer mask in Photoshop. Frequently these masks are pin-registered to the printing paper to ensure precise line-up of the mask with the projected negative. A few of her intricate velum masks are included within the book in perfect alignment with the corresponding print. The effect is to lift the vale on the process that results in the final print. I find the velum’s layers as intriguing as the final print object.

Regarding the book’s title, Golemboski states “In Psychometry, arrangements of old objects in dilapidated spaces serve as metaphors for human emotions and psychological states. The term “psychometry” refers to the pseudo-science of “object reading,” a purported psychic ability to divine the history of objects through physical contact. The objects in these pictures seem haunted. They are designed to transcend their material nature and evoke the mysterious presence of past.”

Personally I have found myself  attempting “object reading” of artifacts of the past; a found photograph, family hand-me-down, or perhaps an old structure that I feel inclined to touch, as though my touch will reveal something of the object’s past. Subliminally I think Golemboski’s photographs connect with me in a similar fashion; that when gazing at her visual poems that I might actually connect with some essence just beyond my comprehension.

In turn, the viewers reading of these hand-altered photographs is as layered as the resulting images, some initially appear to be an easy read, such as Safe house, below, while others are a more complex and ambiguous. In some images the marks attempt to obscure the identity of the object or its external context while in others the marks appear to clarify, instill or attempt to add a layer of meaning. The juxtaposition of found objects with her subsequent inscribed marks creates very magical and beguiling works of photographic art.

Cheers

carol_golemboski-psychometry_1

carol_golemboski-psychometry_2

carol_golemboski-psychometry_3

carol_golemboski-psychometry_4

carol_golemboski-psychometry_5

carol_golemboski-psychometry_6

carol_golemboski-psychometry_7

carol_golemboski-psychometry_8

carol_golemboski-psychometry_9

carol_golemboski-psychometry_10

 

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.