The PhotoBook

January 6, 2017

Young-hwan Choi – BABEL

young-hwan_choi_babel_cover

Copyright 2014 Young-hwan Choi

Photographer: Young-hwan Choi (born & resides in Seoul, South Korea)

Self-Published (South Korea)

Essays: Young-hwan Choi, Dong-sun Jin, Sang-yong Shim

Text: Korean & English

Stiffcover book with tipped in image, perfect binding, four-color lithography, printed by Photonet in South Korea

Photobook designer: Photonet, South Korea

Notes: Choi’s self-published photobook BABEL is a tall, thin collection of black and white photographs that investigate a towering urban landscape in which the vegetation is either attacking a structure or attempting to conceal it, as though a futile potential reclamation is in process.

This is a dark poetic and surreal allegory about the pursuit of happiness by means of accumulating power and wealth through the construction of tall looming structures, similar to the vain construction of the towers of Babel, is but a hollow chase. None of these structures has been able to truly reach heaven.

In writing about Choi’s photograph, Sang-young Shim states “the excessive deficiency of light, which often comes close to absence. Sometimes all light is extinguished except for the minimum required for perception. Even that is reflected light, with the light source nowhere to be seen. The main tones range between grey and black, but as the darkness advances to the extreme level, it often threaten the middle tones as well…the plant is a place that should be brighter, for sure. One should poke a hole through the sky cover in ash-colored clouds. The ominous grey that pressed down should be covered with brilliant colors. But the signs of dawn are too faint.”

I met Choi at Photo Independent last spring in Los Angeles and I was impressed with his photographic exhibit and his two self-published photobooks, this and his earlier REQUIEM (published in 2011).

I find BABAL’s visual narrative to be extremely relevant to the current global events, especially those occurring in the United States. Anyone who builds large and tall structures with their name bronzed in large letters across the front for all to see (hoping for admiration) is indeed pursuing a dark folly that was characteristic of Babel.

Best regards

young-hwan_choi_babel_1

young-hwan_choi_babel_2

young-hwan_choi_babel_3

young-hwan_choi_babel_4

young-hwan_choi_babel_5

young-hwan_choi_babel_6

 

January 1, 2017

Daniel Alexander & Andrew Haslam – When War is Over

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_cover

Copyright 2016 Daniel Alexander & Andrew Haslam

Photographer: Daniel Alexander (born Edinburgh, Scotland, resides London, UK)

Publisher: Dewi Lewis Publishing (UK)

Essay: Daniel Alexander

Text: English

Hardcover book with embossed cover, inserts, multiple gatefolds, sewn binding, four-color lithography, printed in Italy

Photobook designer: Daniel Alexander

Notes: Towards the end of World War I in 1917, the United Kingdom made a decision to establish the Imperial War Graves Commission that currently tracks and maintains the burial of 1.7 million Commonwealth war dead from World War I and II in perpetuity. Daniel Alexander’s photobook When War is Over provides a documentary style investigation of this on-going process of memorialization.

Alexander and Haslam’s photographic project took on more meaning for me as I had recently completed a related photographic project documenting road-side memorials. In my investigation I was documenting what family and friends had erected as a personal memorial at the site of a tragic accident in an attempt to create a remembrance and deal with their personal grief. Similarly Alexander and Haslam investigate an organized process of remembrance for those who tragically passed while serving in the military with the government acting on the behalf of families who might not otherwise have a means or capacity to do so, such that those who passed were honored equally.

For me this photobook calls into the question of how we create a remembrance of those who we have known and loved, but who have now passed on. How do we maintain that memory and how that memory is passed on to later generations? Does a well maintained cemetery create this experience, or does it provide an associated remembrance as an example that is available to us all? Likewise this photobook, although not about someone specifically still elicits a poignant remembrance of my family members who were lost in military action during these wars as well as those who were in the war but have passed since, such as my own father who was in the American army during World War Two.

This photobook documents the various aspects of maintaining these burial sites, which engages administrators, quarry-men, stone cutters, and gardeners for the upkeep of 2,500 cemeteries, 21,000 other burial grounds and 200 memorials for the missing in 154 countries. I also find that this photobook is a sober narrative about the terrible price of war, but if so engaged, those valiantly involved will be remembered.

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_1

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_2

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_3

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_4

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_5

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_6

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_7

daniel_alexander__andrew_haslam-when_war_is_over_8

December 30, 2016

Ara Oshagan – Mirror

ara_oshagan-mirror_cover

Copyright 2015 Ara Oshagan

Photographer: Ara Oshagan (born Beirut, Lebanon, resides Glendale, CA, USA)

Self-Published (USA)

Essay by Ara Oshagan

Music & Lyrics by Gor Mkhitarian

Text: English & Armenian

Hardcover exposed boards with tipped in image, sewn binding, four-color lithography, printed in China

Photobook designer: Ara Oshagan & Varoujan Hovakimyan

Notes: Ara Oshagan and his self-published photobook Mirror uses a documentary style to create a predominately black and white diary of the Gor Mkhitarian band but with an unusual twist; he incorporates some new technology that allows the viewer to scan the appropriate interior pages and link up the related music on their phone. Oshagan has incorporated the free Aurasma.app (available from Apple or Google) that after downloading and subsequently pointing the phone’s camera to the red icon pages of his book, the reader will be able to experience Mkhitarian’s band play the related music.

Oshagan states “Images mirror music. Music is a mirror of images. Darkness and light reflected in both. The diary’s very structure is a mirror; the lexicon of the pages that follow one another has a visual rhythm, an echo of the ebb and flow of music itself.”

Oshagan was present at Photo Book Independent last spring when I had an opportunity to meet him and discuss his photographs as well as the technology lurking in this book. I usually do not provide reviews of musical band documentaries, but this was really an intriguing collaboration of a nice physical photobook with the download of the related music, which I find more interesting that an iPad experience. I am guessing that once the reader downloads this app, that they should even be able to scan the photographs in this review and interact with the music. Cool.

Cheers

ara_oshagan-mirror_1

ara_oshagan-mirror_2

ara_oshagan-mirror_3

ara_oshagan-mirror_4

ara_oshagan-mirror_5

December 8, 2016

Kenneth O’Halloran – Bing, Bing, Bong, Bong, Bing, Bing, Bing

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_cover

Copyright 2016 Kenneth O’Halloran 

Photographer: Kenneth O’Halloran (born Corofin, Country Clare, resides Dublin, Ireland)

Self-published (Ireland)

Essay: Presidential Announcement speech, 2015

Text: English

Hardcover book with printed belly-band, sewn binding, four-color lithography, edition of 500, printed by Mirex, Gdansk (Poland)

Photobook designer: Mac & Ken

Notes: This documentary style project occurred in Los Angles on Hollywood Boulevard in the summer of 2016 during the United States presidential election. O’Halloran’s perspective was that of an outsider looking into an on-going political process, visiting this Southern California region from his native Ireland.

O’Halloran documented the raw emotional reaction of his subjects when confronting the name of one of the candidate’s bronzed in the sidewalk. His portraits of his subjects are tightly composed which appears to add an additional layer of tension to the emotional charged environment surrounding this location.

It might be an understatement that most of his subjects did not appear to react favorably to this landmark, as this candidate went on to lose the popular vote in the election by over two and half million votes as of this writing, while still becoming president-elect.

Best regards, Doug

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_1

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_2

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_3

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_4

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_5

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_6

kenneth_o-halloran-bing_bing_bong_bong_bing_bing_bing_7

November 28, 2016

Jacek Fota – PKiN

Filed under: Book Publications, Book Reviews, Photo Book Discussions, Photo Books — Gerhard Clausing @ 5:59 am

00-Fota cover.jpg

Concept and Ph­otography:  Jacek Fota (Warsaw, Poland)      http://www.jacekfota.com/

Publisher:  Fundacja Centrum Architektury, Warsaw, Poland 2015. Co-financed by the Capital City of Warsaw.      http://centrumarchitektury.org

Essays:  Introduction by Agnieszka Rasmus-Zgorzelska / Interviews by Milena Rachid Chebab / Translation by Zosia Sochańska.

Text:  English (English edition, 430 copies); there is also a Polish edition.

Hardcover book with 112 pages, not numbered; 70 color photographs numbered and captioned in the appendix; sewn binding; cloth cover, printed and bound in Poland.

Photobook design: Ania Nałęcka, Tapir Book Design / Photo editing: Mark Power, Magnum.

 

Notes:   PKiN is the abbreviation of the Polish name (Pałac Kultury i Nauki) for the Palace of Culture and Science in the country’s capital, Warsaw. This huge building containing in excess of 3200 rooms was a gift from the Soviet Union under Stalin to the people of Poland and was created between 1952 and 1955. Construction elements include some of the finest workmanship by craftsmen from Poland and the Soviet Union. This beautifully printed volume of photographs and ten pages of personal notes based on staff interviews shows an embossed replica of the so-called “frog” diagram of the ventilation system of this impressive edifice on the cover as an introduction to the myriad of details inside.

Jacek Fota’s 70 images delve behind the scenes of this magnificent structure as it exists today. In the words of Krzysiek, one of the Palace staff members interviewed, “Now there is much less going on and one can feel that the palace has been neglected.”  Fota’s distanced views evoke a sense of the range of public responses – awe, respect, and perhaps even some resentment of this overwhelming structure, with all its elements and all its history. Fota states that his goal was to document how the palace functions on the inside, “to convey the mysterious, surreal ambience” which the Palace exudes.

And sure enough, the administrators and caretakers of the palace are depicted as relatively small elements of the photographs in which they appear. The general impression of the viewer is one of distance, which enhances the mysteries of what is shown. The viewer also feels overcome by the sheer number and size of the many magnificent structural elements, as they mix with items neglected or in disrepair, mere reflections of the “glory” of former times. One can let one’s imagination take a journey, thinking of events that once gave even more luster to the structure than may be the case today. The images of this astute photographer are well composed and sequenced, and it is a pleasure to wander through the volume from beginning to end.

Gerhard Clausing

01-Fota 1 of 7.jpg

02-Fota 2 of 7.jpg

03-Fota 3 of 7.jpg

04-Fota 4 of 7.jpg

05-Fota 5 of 7.jpg

06-Fota 6 of 7.jpg

07-Fota 7 of 7.jpg

November 5, 2016

Alex Van Gelder – Mumbling Beauty Louise Bourgeois

00-vangeldercover

Photographer:  Alex Van Gelder (now based in Paris)

Publisher:  Thames & Hudson, New York, NY, 2015

Essays:  Foreword by Hans Ulrich Obrist: “Ever Louise” / Introduction by Alex Van Gelder

Text:  English

Hardcover book with 112 pages, not numbered; 81 color photographs without captions; sewn binding; cloth cover with dust jacket, printed and bound in China.

Photobook designer: Béatrice Akar

Notes: This photobook presents 81 extraordinary collaborative images taken during the last three years of life of the French-American artist Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010), who came to the US in 1938 and was primarily known for her sculptures and installations, but also for her paintings and prints. Her art received the most attention from the 1970s on, and she was also a strong fighter for artistic freedom and social justice. Alex Van Gelder, the photographer now based in Paris, became her friend and, from 2008 to 2010, was repeatedly invited to her home in New York City in order to participate in the creation of this personal yet public reality of a highly creative and spirited individual. As Van Gelder says in the foreword, “She became a consummate performer in front of the camera.”

In viewing the images, we can literally experience the joy of the artist in the process of creation, as well as the pain of aging, perhaps foremost among them her inability to move around as freely as possible, as she was paralyzed from the hip down. The photographer uses a variety of techniques to show the difficulties of both artistic creation and old age, such as distortions and long exposures with the resulting blurred appearances: self-reflection through visual ambiguity. The viewer is not only reminded of the work of John Coplans, but also of Cindy Sherman: Louise Bourgeois here assumes many roles (some with disguises) in a number of settings within her house. A very creative look at the last few years of this artist as a result; she is shown working in her studio on paintings, posing with some small sculptures, as well as in mundane settings of everyday life.

This book confronts the viewer with his or her own aging process and creativity. It is a stark yet supportive and positive, even optimistic presentation, at times with some humor as well. As the artist is shown active even at the very end, we get the idea that she is creative and hopeful in spite of it all. Since Louise Bourgeois considered much of her work autobiographical, based in part on childhood traumas, these portraits give us a glimpses of the relationships between the artist and her art, and many other dimensions to reflect on as well. The human body, with its fragile and temporary nature, was a main theme in her art, and this is certainly well represented in this visceral yet elegant collaborative photographic study.

Gerhard Clausing

01-vangelder

02-vangelder

03-vangelder

04-vangelder

05-vangelder

06-vangelder

October 7, 2016

Terry Brown & Gordon Stettinius – Mangini Studio

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_cover

Copyright 2014 Terry Brown & Gordon Stettinius

Photographic collaborators: Terry Brown (resides Richmond, VA) & Gordon Stettinius (resides Richmond, VA) USA

Publisher: Candela Books (Richmond, Virginia)

Essays: Dr. Manuel Moore, Terry Brown, Gordon Stettinius

Text: English

Hardcover book, embossed and tipped-in image, sewn binding, four-color lithography, index, printed by Worth Higgins & Associates, Richmond, VA

Photobook designer: Sarah Rowland

Notes: This photobook is a humorous eight year collaboration between of two photographers, with Terry Brown making the exposures of her subject, Gordon Stettinius (perhaps an alter-ego series of selfies?), with Gordon having the opportunity to play a variety of roles. This conceptual project also reminds me of the work of Cindy Sherman, another photographer/artist who is very adapt at playing a variety of roles for her lens. The reader has an opportunity to really get to know the wild and crazy side of Gordon Stettinius. I will admit, not realizing that this project was underway or knowing Stettinius, it was pretty perplexing to figure out just who Stettinius actually was when I found some of these portraits on-line over the last couple of years.

These interesting, albeit playful, series of studio portraits also has a serious undercurrent that investigates perceived roles and identities.The viewer cannot help in reacting to the various visual persona’s that are represented in this portfolio; hippie, dork, right-wing conservative, left-wing intellectual, low-life, ex-military, skin-head, artist, politician, country musician and even a cross-dresser. I find that this project pokes fun at many of the stereotypes of our society (regretfully pre-Trump), while subtly confronting some of the cultural issues we face today.

Cheers

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_1

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_2

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_3

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_4

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_5

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_6

terry_brown__gordon_stettinius-mangini_studio_7

September 30, 2016

Arion Gabor Kudasz – Memorabilia

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_cover

Copyright 2014 Arion Gabor Kudasz

Photographer: Arion Gabor Kudasz (born, Hungary and resides in Budapest)

Publisher: Magyar Fotografusok Haza Nonprofit Kft (Hungary)

Essays: Arion Gabor Kudasz, Gabriella Uhl, Emese Kudasz

Text: Hungarian, English

Stiffcover book, sewn naked binding, four-color lithography, printed in Budapest, with poster

Photobook designer: Nora Demeczky

Notes: A complex and layered personal photographic project that investigates the memory of his mother, which in turn becomes an investigation on the act and process of attempting to capture a memory. One layer is the process of documenting what remains; the objects, places and traces of a person who has passed. Another layer is attempting to understand if these subtle traces can hold and/or trigger memories? Still another layer; if and for whom will these memories occur?

The photographs are printed on an in-expensive paper stock with a low contrast printing process and are in a documentary style, abet, resembling a catalog or inventory of objects. There are no captions with the pages although a listing of some notes are located at the conclusion of the book. The significance of each of the objects photographed remains a mystery, thus allowing the viewer to construct a personal narrative from the evidence provided.

For me, this is a book that is heavily infused with melancholy. When you are old enough, you live beyond your grandparent’s lifetime and then one day even your own parents. I am emotional touched by this photobook, a wonderful combination of photographs and words/text that is a talisman for my own family’s memories. This photobook is also a gentle reminder to not take your friends and family for granted, as time is relentless and at sometime all too soon you have only memories.

Best regards

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_1

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_2

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_3

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_4

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_5

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_6

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_7

gabor_arion_kudasz-memorabilia_8

September 15, 2016

Lisa Elmaleh – Everglades

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_cover

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_introduction

Copyright 2016 Lisa Elmaleh

Photographer: Lisa Elmaleh (b. Miami, FL & resides in West Virginia, USA)

Publisher: Zatara Press

Essays: Ann McCary Sullivan & Lisa Elmaleh

Text: English

Hardcover book with wrap around cover with interior pocket, Smyth-sewn binding, interior booklet saddle stiched, lithography, without captions or pagination, printed in Richmond, VA

Photobook designer: Andrew Fedynak and Lisa Elmaleh

This photobook, Everglades, by Lisa Elmaleh is a beautiful sonnet about the Florida Everglades and a testimony to her vision and patience. I had enough issues with a 4×5” camera with sheet film on dry land, least taking on the use of huge 8×10” camera (aptly named Fitzgerald Fitzwilliam Fitzgeorge) and the finicky wet collodion glass negative process while stomping around in a swamp. If you are not familiar with the wet collodion process, which dates back to 1851, it requires that the glass plate be prepared and exposed while still “wet” and immediately developed with acid on site after exposure to further complicate her photographic process even more.

Her landscapes photographs of the Everglades wilderness are lyrical and haunting. The resulting imperfections of the wet collodion process add a measure of serendipity and chance, while creating mysterious poetic images, from all that I am told, not unlike the complexity of the Everglades itself. Due to the limitations of her process, this body of work is not meant to be an exacting documentary style investigation of this massive location, but more attuned to capture the emotional essence of her experience.

The hardcover book has contemporary elements in the binding and inclusion of the introductory booklet while the photographs are sequenced and laid out in a classic style, each plate with ample white margins. The plates have an additional coating that provides a very nice sheen that adds to the visual quality of these beautiful black and white images. The Smyth sewn binding allows the book to almost lay flat upon opening that make this book a delightful experience to read.

The photographic titles and date of exposure is available on Lisa Elmaleh’s web site.

Cheers!

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_1

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_2

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_3

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_4

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_5

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_6

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_7

lisa_elmaleh-everglades_8

September 9, 2016

Julia Borissova – Dimitry

julia_borissova-dimitry_cover

julia_borissova-dimitry_binding

Copyright 2016 Julia Borissova

Photographer: Julia Borissova (born Talinn, Estonia, resides St. Petersburg, RU)

Self-published by the artist, signed and numbered edition of 100

Essays: Julia Borissova, Alexander Fokin

Text: English

Hardcover book, hand-sewn naked binding, digital printing in Russia

Photobook designer: Julia Borissova

Notes: Julia Borissova in her recent artist book, Dimitry, investigates the Russian Tsar Dimitry Ivanovich, the youngest and last son of Ivan IV the Terrible, a child of eight who died under “mysterious circumstances” in 1591. What results is Russian intrigue & speculation, perhaps not unlike in the US about who all killed President Kennedy or was responsible for the death of Marilyn Monroe. The story of Dimitry Ivanovich is further confounded by the whispers that he narrowly escaped the murder attempt and that he and his descendants still live on, again perhaps similar to current sightings of Elvis.

Borissova states in her introduction “I was intrigued by how the story can go on without the actions of a hero and how his absence can play a major role and catalyze the further development of the story. It is absence that creates legends and turns them into a myth over time.”

There is little known about this young boy Dimitry, and apparently even less about the events that occurred in 1591 and since, thus leaving ripe the narrative of his sad saga and the lingering effects on Russian culture. Her narrative is based on a small part of reality, large doses of myth and all wrapped in an enigma. To develop her elusive narrative Borissova has creatively leaned into photo-collage, montage, and layered images interwoven with some documentary style landscape photographs. The photo-collages and montages are initially jarring, appearing almost crude in the stark lines of the constructed objects, but are also poetic, abstract and wonderfully metaphoric. Her interior images remind me of the style of the Russian abstract montage artist of the 1920s.

Thus Borissova’s narrative has been symbolically ripped from the pages of a Russian 1920’s version of People magazine. She continues to be a Russian photobook artist to watch.

Other artist books by Julia Borissova featured on The PhotoBook: DOM, address, Running to the Edge

Cheers

julia_borissova-dimitry_1

julia_borissova-dimitry_2

julia_borissova-dimitry_3

julia_borissova-dimitry_4

julia_borissova-dimitry_5

julia_borissova-dimitry_6

julia_borissova-dimitry_7

julia_borissova-dimitry_8

julia_borissova-dimitry_9

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Blog at WordPress.com.