The PhotoBook Journal

December 16, 2016

Early bird discount for photobook workshop ends this Saturday


LACP Introduction to Photo Book Design, photo Douglas Stockdale

The early-bird registration discount of 20% for my Introduction to Photo Book Design workshop that I will be leading next April over two weekends will be ending midnight this Saturday, December 17th. This creative workshop is sponsored by Los Angeles Center of Photography (LACP).  So if you plan to be in the Southern California area (aka best-coast), time to check this workshop out and take advantage of this discount.

Could also be a wonderful Christmas present for someone special ;- )

Just saying…

your wonderful Editor.

December 6, 2016

Photo-eye Santa Fe

Filed under: Book Publications, Photo Book Stores, Photo Books — Tags: , , — Doug Stockdale @ 6:02 pm


photo-eye Santa Fe NM 2016 copyright Douglas Stockdale

One of the pleasures of our recent Thanksgiving road trip to Santa Fe was visiting the photo-eye book store. After the first visit, I had to return for a second visit as there were holiday deals to take advantage of.

The photo-eye bookstore is pretty unique in the United States as other than photographic galleries it is one of the few, if perhaps only, book stores dedicated entirely to contemporary photobooks. Note: this is NOT a book store where you will find any photographic books that attempt to explain photographic techniques, e.g. Lightroom, Photoshop or how to use a Canon 5DMarkIII.

I met up with Christopher Johnson, in the photo above, the Bookstore Manager who provided a quick orientation to the store’s layout as well as some photobook titles to check out. This is not a huge store by any means, but very, very well stocked!

It’s my guess that the majority of their book sales are derived from their website, and similar to other photobook websites, they have leveraged their photobook inventory into a nice retail operation.A little frustration for me that some of the photobooks that photo-eye had recently featured in their newsletter were not available in the store that day; Greogroy Halpern’s  ZZYZX (MACK) is in second printing as first edition is sold out, Mark Steinmetz’s Fifteen Miles to K-Ville (Stanley/Baker, London) which were still with Steinmetz being signed, and Mark Ruwedel’s Message from the Exterior (MACK), which was not in stock yet.

Nevertheless, what I did purchase was Jason Fulford and Gregory Halpern’s The Photographer’s Playbook (Aperture) and then on my return to the store to take advantage of their holiday sale discount, Mark Steinmetz’s The Players (Nazraeli Press) which was signed. I wanted to have an actual copy of The Photographer’s Playbook for a couple of reasons, first as one of my reference books for my photobook workshop and when I am reviewing submissions for LensCulture I reference this book to those photographers who seem to be in the midst of searching for a photographic project to focus on. For Steinmetz, he’s a photographer whom we have not reviewed yet and I felt it was about time. Expect to see Steinmetz’s book review after the first of the year.

I will had to admit that I am a bit biased; photo-eye has in stock and selling my photobook Ciociaria (signed!) and the last copies of my limited edition artist-book Pine Lake.




November 24, 2016

Indie Photobook Library moves to Yale University

Filed under: Photo Book NEWS, Photo Books — Tags: , , , — Doug Stockdale @ 10:13 pm

Ciociaria published by Edizioni Punctum, now in the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

Just announced by the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Yale University that the Indie Photobook Library (iPL) has been just incorporated into their collection. The collection includes more than 2,000 photobooks from around the world along with related ephemera, archives of the iPL’s history, and Larissa Leclair’s personal collection related to self-publishing. The iPL  had focused on self-published photobooks, imprints independently published and distributed, photography exhibition catalogs, print-on-demand photobooks, artists’ books, zines, photobooks printed on newsprint, limited edition photobooks, non-English language photography books, and more. This collection covers the period of indie photobooks starting in 2008 through 2016. These volumes build on an already great strength of this library and will surely be used extensively by scholars and students at Yale and beyond for a long time.

In conjunction with this change, the iPL will cease operations and no longer be accepting any more book submissions.

November 5, 2016

Alex Van Gelder – Mumbling Beauty Louise Bourgeois


Photographer:  Alex Van Gelder (residing Paris, France)

Publisher:  Thames & Hudson, New York, NY, © 2015

Essays:  Foreword by Hans Ulrich Obrist: “Ever Louise” / Introduction by Alex Van Gelder

Text:  English

Hardcover book with 112 pages, not numbered; 81 color photographs without captions; sewn binding; cloth cover with dust jacket, printed and bound in China

Photobook Designer:  Béatrice Akar



This photobook presents 81 extraordinary collaborative images taken during the last three years of life of the French-American artist Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010), who came to the US in 1938 and was primarily known for her sculptures and installations, but also for her paintings and prints. Her art received the most attention from the 1970s on, and she was also a strong fighter for artistic freedom and social justice. Alex Van Gelder, the photographer now based in Paris, became her friend and, from 2008 to 2010, was repeatedly invited to her home in New York City in order to participate in the creation of this personal yet public reality of a highly creative and spirited individual. As Van Gelder says in the foreword, “She became a consummate performer in front of the camera.”

In viewing the images, we can literally experience the joy of the artist in the process of creation, as well as the pain of aging, perhaps foremost among them her inability to move around as freely as possible, as she was paralyzed from the hip down. The photographer uses a variety of techniques to show the difficulties of both artistic creation and old age, such as distortions and long exposures with the resulting blurred appearances: self-reflection through visual ambiguity. The viewer is not only reminded of the work of John Coplans, but also of Cindy Sherman: Louise Bourgeois here assumes many roles (some with disguises) in a number of settings within her house. A very creative look at the last few years of this artist as a result; she is shown working in her studio on paintings, posing with some small sculptures, as well as in mundane settings of everyday life.

This book confronts the viewer with his or her own aging process and creativity. It is a stark yet supportive and positive, even optimistic presentation, at times with some humor as well. As the artist is shown active even at the very end, we get the idea that she is creative and hopeful in spite of it all. Since Louise Bourgeois considered much of her work autobiographical, based in part on childhood traumas, these portraits give us a glimpses of the relationships between the artist and her art, and many other dimensions to reflect on as well. The human body, with its fragile and temporary nature, was a main theme in her art, and this is certainly well represented in this visceral yet elegant collaborative photographic study.

Gerhard Clausing








October 28, 2016

Yanina Shevchenko – Crossing Over



Copyright 2013 Yanina Shevchenko

Photographer: Yanina Shevchenko (born: Russia – resides: Barcelona, Spain)

Publisher: The Velvet Cell (London, Taipei)

Essays: Yanina Shevchenko

Text: English

Stiffcover book, saddle-stitch binding, four-color lithography, printed in Taiwan

Photobook designer: Velvet Cell Graphics

Notes: In America a “road-trip” in which one wants get up-close and personal with the land is usually by accomplished by means a car. To cross an even greater expanse of Russia and attempt to create a personal relationship with the land, a road-trip one usually associates with is by means of the Trans-Siberian Railway. This photobook is Yanina Schevchenko’s narrative using a documentary style and resulting from riding the rails over a duration of fourteen days; from Moscow to the end of the Trans-Siberian Railway and then immediately returning. Her subject was the expansive rural and intermittent urban landscape of Russia in an attempt to investigate the regional culture along this route.

As a reader who has traveled by railway in both the United States and Europe, what can be observed in Shevchenko’s photographs appears similar in one aspect but not all-together different; stretches of open and frequently monotonous rural landscape with short duration’s of the urban industrial landscape. I also found myself recently returning to this book as I am now make frequent commutes to a laboratory space about an hour and half away that involves a long drive with a short stretch of stop and go traffic. During the drive, the ensuing landscape is a soft blur, but due to the serendipity and chance of where I made the brief stops in heavy traffic, the adjacent landscape takes on a startling clarity. These are similar elements that Shevchenko captures in her investigation. Perhaps some of the structures of the steppes are a bit unique, but the land adjacent to a noisy rail line is a place that is not usually attractive but can still be a very interesting to contemplate.







September 30, 2016

Arion Gabor Kudasz – Memorabilia


Copyright 2014 Arion Gabor Kudasz

Photographer: Arion Gabor Kudasz (born, Hungary and resides in Budapest)

Publisher: Magyar Fotografusok Haza Nonprofit Kft (Hungary)

Essays: Arion Gabor Kudasz, Gabriella Uhl, Emese Kudasz

Text: Hungarian, English

Stiffcover book, sewn naked binding, four-color lithography, printed in Budapest, with poster

Photobook designer: Nora Demeczky

Notes: A complex and layered personal photographic project that investigates the memory of his mother, which in turn becomes an investigation on the act and process of attempting to capture a memory. One layer is the process of documenting what remains; the objects, places and traces of a person who has passed. Another layer is attempting to understand if these subtle traces can hold and/or trigger memories? Still another layer; if and for whom will these memories occur?

The photographs are printed on an in-expensive paper stock with a low contrast printing process and are in a documentary style, abet, resembling a catalog or inventory of objects. There are no captions with the pages although a listing of some notes are located at the conclusion of the book. The significance of each of the objects photographed remains a mystery, thus allowing the viewer to construct a personal narrative from the evidence provided.

For me, this is a book that is heavily infused with melancholy. When you are old enough, you live beyond your grandparent’s lifetime and then one day even your own parents. I am emotional touched by this photobook, a wonderful combination of photographs and words/text that is a talisman for my own family’s memories. This photobook is also a gentle reminder to not take your friends and family for granted, as time is relentless and at sometime all too soon you have only memories.

Best regards









September 15, 2016

Lisa Elmaleh – Everglades



Copyright 2016 Lisa Elmaleh

Photographer: Lisa Elmaleh (b. Miami, FL & resides in West Virginia, USA)

Publisher: Zatara Press

Essays: Ann McCary Sullivan & Lisa Elmaleh

Text: English

Hardcover book with wrap around cover with interior pocket, Smyth-sewn binding, interior booklet saddle stiched, lithography, without captions or pagination, printed in Richmond, VA

Photobook designer: Andrew Fedynak and Lisa Elmaleh

This photobook, Everglades, by Lisa Elmaleh is a beautiful sonnet about the Florida Everglades and a testimony to her vision and patience. I had enough issues with a 4×5” camera with sheet film on dry land, least taking on the use of huge 8×10” camera (aptly named Fitzgerald Fitzwilliam Fitzgeorge) and the finicky wet collodion glass negative process while stomping around in a swamp. If you are not familiar with the wet collodion process, which dates back to 1851, it requires that the glass plate be prepared and exposed while still “wet” and immediately developed with acid on site after exposure to further complicate her photographic process even more.

Her landscapes photographs of the Everglades wilderness are lyrical and haunting. The resulting imperfections of the wet collodion process add a measure of serendipity and chance, while creating mysterious poetic images, from all that I am told, not unlike the complexity of the Everglades itself. Due to the limitations of her process, this body of work is not meant to be an exacting documentary style investigation of this massive location, but more attuned to capture the emotional essence of her experience.

The hardcover book has contemporary elements in the binding and inclusion of the introductory booklet while the photographs are sequenced and laid out in a classic style, each plate with ample white margins. The plates have an additional coating that provides a very nice sheen that adds to the visual quality of these beautiful black and white images. The Smyth sewn binding allows the book to almost lay flat upon opening that make this book a delightful experience to read.

The photographic titles and date of exposure is available on Lisa Elmaleh’s web site.










August 25, 2016

Rania Matar – L’Enfant-Femme

Rania_Matar- L_Enfant-Femme_cover

Copyright 2015 Rania Matar

Photographer: Rania Matar (b. Lebanon – resides Boston, MA, USA)

Publisher: Damiani (Italy)

Essays: Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan, Louis Lowry, Kristen Gresh

Text: English

Hardcover book with tipped in photo, sewn binding, four-color lithography, captions and pagination, Plates, printed by Grafiche Damiani in Italy

Photobook designer: Jesse Holborn, Design Holborn

Notes: This is Rania Matar’s third book, L’Enfant-Femme (French: The Child Woman) is a continuation of her previous feminine exploration, A Girl in Her Room, of young girls on the cusp of womanhood. Likewise, this is also a study of the similarities and subtle differences of two geographic regions and their associated cultures; Northeastern U.S.A. and Lebanon, places that Matar knows equally well.

Her young subjects have a direct gaze towards the photographer and her lens, thus a direct connection with the viewer. As pointed out in essay by Kristen Gresh, Matar’s analog photographic methods do not provide the immediacy of visual feedback that her subjects probably have become so accustomed to. We view their meditative gaze, not smiling as requested by Matar, but sometimes I can still detect the hint of a smile in the corner of their mouths or in stark contrast, a guarded, if not defiant stare.

Matar’s captions provide a minimum of information about her subjects; age at the time of the portrait, and the young girl’s first name, although to dispel some of the ambiguity about her subjects, the location of each photograph is provided in the concluding page of Plates. To further reveal that these young women are in a stage of rapid transition, the concluding section has a series of facing pages with her subjects at the age of when this project began in in 2011 and then close to its conclusion in 2015.

As elegantly stated by Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan “work that inspires the viewers to reassess their stereotypes of girls and women, particularly in the Middle East. In calling these boundary-building preconceptions into question, Matar brings emphasis instead to what is both unique and universal, and thus to what connects us all.”

Like many great photographers, this photobook also provides a glimpse into her latest on-going portrait project in which she is working that I expect will be published soon (hint: daughters and their mothers).

Rania Matar has been previously featured on The PhotoBook: A Girl in Her Room (2012) and Ordinary Lives (2009).


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July 28, 2016

Christoph Lingg – By The World Forgot – Portraits of the Indigenous Peoples of Asia


Copyright 2014 Christoph Lingg

Photographer: Christoph Lingg (b. Schoppernau – resides Vienna, Austria)

Publisher: Editions Aufbruch (Austria)

Essays: Christoph Lingg, Diana Vinding

Text: English, Deutsch

Hardcover book with wood veneer (8 options to choose from), sewn binding, four-color lithography (black and white images), pagination and geographical chapters, Reading List, printed in Czech Republic, covers produced and bound by Lingg in Vienna.

Photobook designer: Christoph Lingg

Notes: Over the past years, Christoph Lingg has been creating black and white portraits of the Indigenous People in the broadly defined geo-region of Asia, including Pakistan, Indonesia, Mongolia, Siberia, Myanmar, India and China. This is not an attempt to be fully inclusive investigation of the cultures of Kalasha, Dani, Buriad, Nenets, Palaung, Apatani, Yao and Hani to name a few that are featured in his book.

His subjects are frequently backed with a simple white cloth and I am reminded of the earlier on-location portraits of Irving Penn. It is a technique to isolate the subject from their environment and which focuses the viewers on the individual captured in front of the lens. Interspersed are environmental portraits in which his subjects are situated in their local cultural elements to provide more context about their living conditions.

Frequently the viewer is met by a weary gaze at or a slightly off-lens look that is telling about the economic and political conditions that could be considered characteristic of Indigenous people, a cultural sub-group within a larger population. Lingg may have only been among his subjects for a short time and due to language and custom barriers, probably not sufficient time to establish or develop a really deep and open relationship. Nevertheless the portraits are powerful and well presented in this hardcover book, although the decision to print on a warm matte paper creates a lower contrast image lacking deep blacks.

Christoph Lingg’s photobook, Shut Down, was previously featured on The PhotoBook.










July 7, 2016

Susan S. Bank – Piercing the Darkness


Copyright 2016 Susan S. Bank

Photographer: Susan S. Bank (b. Portsmouth, NH and resides in both Philadelphia, PA & Portsmouth, NH USA)

Publisher: Brilliant Press, Exton (PA)

Essays: Susan S. Bank, John T. Hill

Text: English

Hardcover book with dust jacket, sewn binding, four-color lithography, List of Plates, printed by Brilliant Press in USA

Photobook designer: Jesse Holborn

Notes: As I had stated in an earlier review, there will be a number of photobooks forthcoming about Cuba. Nevertheless, there are a few photographers, such as Susan S. Bank, who is investigating the island, people and subsequently the culture of Cuba for an extended period.

This is Bank’s second book about Cuba and for this poignant project she is focusing on the people of Havana. She has carefully chosen to photograph her subject utilizing analog black & white with her Leica to get up close and personal. She is an urban photographer who can capture the various Havana street activities as well as someone who appears to be able to gain trust and probe inside the cultural boundaries to observe life as it unfolds. All the while Bank steers clear of the potential Cuban clichés to dive beneath the veneer and focus on capturing quiet and intimate personal moments. This is a gritty photobook that connects with me and I feel provides a real sense of who the people are that reside in Havana. Recommended.










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